Comics are referenced in songs and other media pretty frequently, which is great. Readers get a little window into the people who are writing songs and other material. I also find songs and other stories subtly referenced in comic books and I love it. It takes me out of the story, but when it's done well, it also gives me a new view into it.

I was reading Matt Fraction's run on the Invincible Iron Man (again, because I'm on a little kick). The story arc is one where Tony is erasing his memories in an attempt to prevent authorities from stealing important information stored in his head as data. A major conceit of this erasure is that Tony can no longer pilot his most advanced Iron Man armor, but he requires the arc reactors in the armor to do the deleting.

Because of this, Tony must enter an older version of his armor in each issue, at the same time, confronting enemies and allies from the time period when he wore the armor. It's a nice way to tell the story and create a retrospective.

At a key point in the story, Tony is tracked down by Madam Masque. She is torn, remembering their torrid affair, fueled by alcohol and absent from the powers that make him a hero and her a villain. She tries to force his love.

When it is apparent that this will not give results, she detonates an explosive device.

I Hope We Both Die

I stopped reading. This is a line from the song No Children by the Mountain Goats. I love this song. It fits with Madam Masque's angst in this storyline shockingly well. Was it intentional? It's subtle, but not too subtle.

My brief investigations show that John Darnielle, who wrote the song, noticed it as well. He and Matt Fraction seem to have bonded over it (they're doing readings together).

I'm now on the lookout for other stories where song choices bring readers a little more insight.